Collection of Antique Persian Heriz Rugs

Heriz Rugs – The village of Heriz is located just west of Tabriz in the Persian occupied part of Azerbaijan. Heriz carpets are mostly distinguished by their rectilinear designs, a departure from the traditional arabesques and scrolls typical of Persian manufactory. A large central stepped medallion with corners or an all over design of highly stylized floral motifs is quite typical. Repeating patterns are less common. The pile is thick and heavy and the color palette is rich and varied. Older Heriz rugs had madder grounds and medallions mostly of indigo. The finer rugs use the technique “double outlining”, where the design of the rug is separated from the field by two lines in different colors. This design element sets the gold standard for the best Heriz designs.

Originating in Northwest Persia and the Iranian province of East Azerbaijan, Heriz Serapi antique rugs from Persia include regional patterns created in several dozen towns and villages in the area. These Azeri-Turkish groups from the Caucasus were pushed south by invading Russian and Soviet forces, and the area was subject to turbulent political influences that continued through the 20th century. Turkic nomads have produced fine carpets for export and resale since the 1700’s, and antique Heriz rugs continue to enjoy great popularity in Europe and the U.S. The Heriz moniker is applied to regional rugs originating in Ahar, Gorevan and several other prominent villages. This has lead to some confusion about these trade terms.

The city of Heriz is located roughly 60 miles from the legendary carpet-producing city of Tabriz. Although they are closely related in some respects, their styles remain distinct. Antique Heriz rugs are known for their thick, strong and durable structure. Unlike many areas of Persia, rugs from Heriz are made with the symmetric Turkish or Ghiordes knot, which is attached to a specially woven foundation that includes a thick cotton warp and weft. The structure is only one factor that contributes to the durability and stability of antique rugs from Heriz, which differ from their cousins, the Serapi Rugs and the Bakshaish rugs. Further, some carpets from this region are referred to as Heriz Serapi rugs. Tucked into the foothills surrounding the historically active volcano Mount Sabalan, Heriz sits on top of rich mineral reserves and some of the largest copper deposits in the world. Pastoral nomads known as the Shahsavan migrated across the area moving closer to Mount Sabalan in the summer and further away during the harsh winters. The result is extremely durable wool containing trace amounts of copper that act as a natural mordant and dye fixative.

Since the early 19th century, Heriz has been producing European-sized carpets that define the angular style of northwest Persian rugs. These classically colored carpets, including Serapi Heriz rugs, often feature a traditional pairing of crimson red and clear Persian blue, which are combined with varied neutrals. Heriz rugs often feature dense allover patterns and angular octofoil medallions surrounded by rectilinear vine-scrolls decorated with a rich variety of contrasting colors.

Please note, the terms Heriz and Serapi are pretty much interchangeable. Heriz rugs are among the most recognizable Persian rugs because of their distinctive geometric designs and the expressive power of their drawing.

Both the “Serapi” and Heriz rugs tend to have strong medallion designs accented through the use of color. That said, allover design Heriz rugs are not that uncommon. Heriz carpets rely on floral inspired patterns with sharp strap-work vines and grand palmettes with zig-zag contouring.

Where other antique rugs from Persia would utilize a curved form, antique Heriz rugs will apply series of angular twists and sharp straight angle turns, imparting an emphatic geometry to the rug design.

Heriz rugs have glorious color, with rich reds, blues, greens, and yellows resonating against ivory. Much of the formal vocabulary, drawing, and color sensibility of these rugs is traceable to the classical antique Caucasian rugs of the eighteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Since the Heriz region of northern Perisa is not far from the Caucasus, it is not surprising that Heriz carpets have preserved so much of the classical Caucasian tradition. Some antique Heriz rugs , however, especially those produced in silk, display a different drawing and design vocabulary linked to other types of Persian carpet. They are identified as “Heriz” rugs primarily by their weave.

Just west of Tabriz lies the village of Heriz, located in the Iranian part of Azerbaijan. Herizes are mostly distinguished by their rectilinear designs, a departure from the traditional arabesques and scrolls typical of Persian manufactory. A large central stepped medallion with corners or an allover design of highly stylized floral motifs is quite typical. Repeating patterns are less common.

The pile is thick and heavy and the color palette is rich and varied. Older Heriz rugs had madder grounds and medallions mostly of indigo. The finer antique carpets use the technique “double outlining”, where the design of the rug is separated from the field by two lines in different colors. This design element sets the gold standard for the best Heriz designs.

The Heriz style of is a paradigm for the traditional geometric designs of Northwest Persia. These distinctive rugs are woven with tribal weaves which accentuates the angles and boldness exhibited in the highly stylized floral motifs.

Typically these Oriental rugs carry a masculine aura to them. As far as interior design goes, this feature makes them perfect options for libraries, studies, and other rooms rich with wooden or earthy accents though they are also popular in living rooms both formal and non.

View our current collection of Persian antique Heriz rugs below:

Antique Persian Heriz Rugs and Carpets
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