Tribal and Collectible Antique Caucasian Kuba Rugs

Antique Kuba Rugs, also known as Quba, is a historic Khanate or administrative district populated by the Lezghi people and Azeri Turks. Located in present-day Azerbaijan, the city of Kuba produced some of the most distinctive and finely executed Caucasian rugs. They are beautifully and richly colored, and they combine cryptic Caucasian symbols with exceptionally decorative motifs. Regional sub-types, such as Konagkend rugs, are often lumped together with the diverse Kuba group.

Read more …

Antique Kuba rugs include famous chi-chi prayer rugs, large-scale blossom patterns and richly colored rugs decorated with a series of radiant medallions. Lezghi stars and Chelaberd medallions with appendages that resemble eagle’s wings or sunbursts are also produced. Some of the most splendid allover patterns feature exquisite latticework motifs that are filled with floral sprigs.

Although antique Kuba rugs are exceptionally diverse, they are united by their colors and superb craftsmanship. This versatility and level of quality makes it easy to dress them up or tone them down to match the ambiance of sleek modern interiors or traditional decor. Antique Kuba rugs are colorful, symbol-filled works of art that are sure to delight seasoned collectors and those who are new to the world of Caucasian rugs and carpets.

Kuba rugs Noted for their precise drawing and detailed design, antique Kuba rugs are probably the finest and most tightly woven antique rugs from the Caucasus. Closely related to Shirvans and Dagestans, they are distinguished by a dense, ribbed structure and higher knot count. While medallion compositions do appear on Kubas, they are best known for their meticulous allover patterns of small, carefully worked motifs. Some of the more well known and sought-after Kuba types are the so called “Chi-Chi” and Konaghend patterns, or the Alpan and Zeykhur designs. If Kazaks are the most powerful of Caucasian Rugs, Kubas a surely the the most elegant.

History of Tribal Kuba Rugs from the Caucasus

Kuba Rugs – The area between Shirvan and Daghestan in the eastern Caucasus is Kuba. This area, with its surrounding villages, is the most prolific and justly celebrated source of Caucasus weaving.

These days, tourists come to Kuba to see hundreds of apple orchards, which in the spring, fills the air with the scent of apple blossoms. The variety and richness of design and color is so varied and extraordinary that no generalized statement can be made about Kuba weaving.

Antique Kuba Rugs by Nazmiyal
Antique Kuba Rugs

The area between Shirvan and Daghestan in the eastern Caucasus is Kuba. This area, with its surrounding villages, is the most prolific and justly celebrated source of Caucasus weaving.

These days, tourists come to Kuba to see hundreds of apple orchards, which in the spring, fills the air with the scent of apple blossoms. The variety and richness of design and color is so varied and extraordinary that no generalized statement can be made about Kuba weaving.

Antique Caucasian Kuba Rugs by Nazmiyal
Antique Caucasian Kuba Rug

Kuba was a Khanate of Persia (a Khanate is equivalent to a state or region in the old Persian system). Historians date the transfer of Kuba to the Czarist Russians to 1806. How old then is the city of Kuba? Several different sources state that Kuba did not exist until circa 1750.

The United States Embassy, on the other hand, confirms the existence of a majestic 16th-century fortress that dominates the city of Kuba. Nevertheless, this area has been settled for centuries; in nearby Khanalyg, there is a 9th century A.D. Zoroastrian temple.

Antique Kuba Rug by Nazmiyal
Antique Kuba Rug

Many of the dragon rugs and floral designs possibly originated from the Kuba region, which probably have the longest weaving history in the Caucacus. Both of these designs have been attributed by some scholars to a Persian inspiration, while others have suggested a closer link with early Seljuk weaving.

The majority of Kuba rugs of the 19th century display crowded floral motifs, either free standing, combined with large geometric motifs, or retained within an allover lattice.

Show Less …

View our selection of Caucasian antique Kuba rugs below:

Showing all 4 results

Showing all 4 results